Three assistant professors join School faculty this spring

January 28, 2019

This spring semester, the UC Berkeley School of Public Health is fortunate to welcome three more new members to the faculty. These assistant professors will add expertise in environmental exposures, infectious diseases, and health inequality.

Andres CardenasAndres Cardenas PhD, MPH
Assistant Professor
Environmental Health Sciences

Andres Cardenas develops and applies computational approaches in environmental epigenomics to examine environmental hazards and their role in disease development. He primarily evaluates environmental exposures in utero and epigenetic modifications, investigating the prenatal influence of metals, air pollution, endocrine disrupting compounds, diet and prenatal maternal medication on the epigenome of children. Prior to joining the Berkeley faculty, Cardenas was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University.

Jay GrahamJay Graham PhD, MPH, MBA
Assistant Professor
Environmental Health Sciences

Jay Graham applies epidemiologic methods and next-generation DNA sequencing to illuminate the spatial and temporal transmission of antimicrobial resistance and zoonotic infectious diseases. His research has contributed to public health initiatives for the prevention and control of infectious diseases, particularly concerning water, sanitation and hygiene. This work has brought him to the US-Mexico border, where he conducted research on the primary prevention of diarrheal disease and pneumonia within informal settlements in Ciudad Juárez. He recently served as a Science & Technology Policy Fellow for the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has directed the graduate program in Global Environmental Health at the George Washington University School of Public Health.

Mark FlemingMark Fleming PhD, MS
Assistant Professor
Community Health Sciences

Mark Fleming’s research bridges anthropology and public health to investigate racial and economic inequities and health disparities. His research focuses on the impacts on chronic disease of urban poverty, policing and violence. A recently initiated project examines criminal justice involvement as a health determinant for frequent emergency department users. Fleming also uses ethnographic and mixed methods to evaluate and develop social needs—like food, housing, and transportation—in safety-net healthcare settings. His work considers more broadly the changing relationships between health care, social services, and criminal justice. He previously investigated the social determinants of health for urban transit workers, examining the political economy of work and health in San Francisco.