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An RAND-UC Berkeley School of Public Health analysis demonstrates significant reductions in heart attacks in San Diego County over a 6-year period following a county-wide collaboration to prevent heart disease known as Be There San Diego. The more...
California insurer and provider markets are becoming more concentrated, leading to a steep rise in the amount consumers pay for health care, according to a new study from policy experts in the UC Berkeley School of Public Health. The study, from the more...
As part of a March Health Affairs issue examining health care delivery system innovations, a trio of UC Berkeley School of Public Health experts analyzed the efficacy of reference pricing—a new component of health insurance design that motivates the more...
The implementation of reference pricing for diagnostic laboratory tests, when combined with access to price information, was associated with reductions in prices and payments by both employer and employees, a recent UC Berkeley School of Public more...
A new study suggests Covered California’s authority to select health insurers successfully held down premium costs. The research was published in the May issue of Health Affairs, and was conducted at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health in more...
How you offer patients an HIV test has a significant impact on the likelihood of them accepting tests, finds a University of California study published by The BMJ on January 19. Worldwide, approximately 37 million people are infected with HIV and more...
A new study, published in the August issue of Health Affairs, found that states with prior approval authority over health insurance rates in the individual market experienced a 10 percentage point lower rate of increase in premiums, and states with more...
Can a patient go from 132 visits to an emergency department in one year to zero visits in 10 months? Would it take a major corrective surgery or a new cure-all drug to accomplish this feat? Actually, in the case of one accountable care organization more...
California has more accountable care organizations (ACOs) than any other state in the country, with particularly rapid growth over the past two years. This is a good thing, according to the Berkeley Forum for Improving California’s Healthcare more...
According to the CDC, almost half of all Americans have one or more chronic illnesses. For those age 65 or older, the figure is closer to 85 percent. This make chronic illness care a crucial test for health care reform in two ways. One, will better more...
There are more than 600 accountable care organizations (ACOs) in the United States working to improve the quality of care and reduce costs for a defined population of patients with associated financial rewards or losses. A major question is whether more...
A report released today by the Berkeley Forum for Improving California's Healthcare Delivery System finds that California hospital spending could be reduced by billions of dollars over the next eight years if patients’ wishes about palliative care more...
The trend of hospitals consolidating medical groups and physician practices in an effort to improve the coordination of patient care is backfiring and increasing the cost of patient care, according to a new study led by a UC Berkeley health policy more...
In an analysis and commentary published in the October issue of Health Affairs, James C. Robinson, Leonard D. Schaeffer Professor of Health Economics, describes public and private sector opportunities to enhance the value of specialty more...
When Berkeley researchers conducted a national survey of physician practices on their involvement in Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), they discovered some good and bad news.  “The good news is that practices that have currently joined ACOs more...

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