Research Highlights

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New test rapidly identifies antibiotic-resistant superbugs
By Kara Manke Read on the Berkeley News website  When you get sick, you want the right treatment fast. But certain infectious microbes are experts at evading the very anti-bacterial drugs designed to fight them. A simple and inexpensive new test more...
Racial discrimination linked to higher risk of chronic illness in African American women
Read the Article on the Berkeley News Website  Less-educated African American women who report experiencing high levels of racial discrimination may face greater risk of developing chronic diseases, says a new study by UC Berkeley researchers. more...
An RAND-UC Berkeley School of Public Health analysis demonstrates significant reductions in heart attacks in San Diego County over a 6-year period following a county-wide collaboration to prevent heart disease known as Be There San Diego. The more...
Almost half of the population of Managua, Nicaragua, is infected with Zika virus, according to a study by UC Berkeley School of Public Health researchers. Eva Harris, professor of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology at the School of Public Health more...
hydro- fracking derricks drilling natural gas on a plain
A recent study published in Environmental Epidemiology shows that living near natural gas operations may be taking an invisible toll on our public health. The researchers connected fracking-induced earthquakes to episodes of anxiety in the nearby more...
Shuttering coal- and oil-fired power plants lowers the rate of preterm births in neighboring communities and improves fertility, according to two new University of California, Berkeley, studies. The researchers compared preterm births and fertility more...
Hospital building exterior
California insurer and provider markets are becoming more concentrated, leading to a steep rise in the amount consumers pay for health care, according to a new study from policy experts in the UC Berkeley School of Public Health. The study, from the more...
Woman examined by doctor
The way researchers contextualize race may color scientific understanding and inadvertently impede progress in addressing health inequities, according to an analysis from researchers in the UC Berkeley School of Public Health. Amani M. Nuru-Jeter, more...
Farm workers pick  and package strawberries
A recent study conducted by researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley’s Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health (CERCH) found that worry about deportation was associated with multiple cardiovascular health risk factors in more...
Not only is urban greenness unequally distributed by neighborhood demographics, but poorer neighborhoods and those with more minorities are losing greenness, according to a recent UC Berkeley led study. The study, published on December 10 in the more...
Woman waiting anxiously in waiting room
Almost one in five older patients with a chronic disease reported experiencing health care discrimination in a large national survey that asked about their daily experiences of discrimination between 2008 and 2014. Black patients were most likely to more...
Image of guns and ammunition.
By Brett Israel | UC Berkeley Media Relations brett.israel@berkeley.edu, (510) 643-7741 When gun shows are held in Nevada, gun-related deaths and injuries spike across the state line in California for at least the next two weeks. A new study by more...
James Robinson
As prescription drug spending continues to rise in the United States, along with prices for new and well-established drugs, insurers, employers and patients are searching for ways to cut costs. A new study by UC Berkeley School of Public Health more...
Spraying pesticides
Elemental sulfur, the most heavily used pesticide in California, may harm the respiratory health of children living near farms that use the pesticide, according to new research led by UC Berkeley School of Public Health researchers in the Center for more...
As the number of white residents in a neighborhood declines, noise rises. But noise pollution is inescapable in segregated cities, where it is worse for everyone, according to the first breakdown of noise exposure along racial, ethnic, and more...

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