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Researcher in the School of Public Health examined data from nearly 2,000 people who suffered injuries after being hit by rubber or plastic bullets in countries including Israel/Palestine, Britain/Northern Ireland, South Asian countries, the United more...
Joel Moskowitz, director and principal investigator for the Center for Family and Community Health, was quoted in the Mercury News about California’s new cell-phone safety guidelines, saying the new advisory goes “well beyond what any federal health more...
NPR StateImpact: Joan Casey, a postdoctoral scholar in the School of Public Health who has researched the impact of fracking on infant health, weighed in on research from the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago and Princeton more...
Health Affairs: Alain Enthoven’s knowledge and ideas on how to improve our health system and move toward achieving universal coverage are insightful and worth debating. In his Health Affairs blog post “Single Payer Is Not The Solution To The Problem more...
Visionlearning: This World of Humans is a science podcast dedicated to recent advances in biology and social science. TWOH is a collaboration with Visionlearning and includes resources to aid science instructors in using this podcast and its more...
 California Magazine: We’re still living large. Very large. According to the latest statistics from the Centers for Disease Control, 39.8 percent of adult Americans and 18.5 percent of American youths were obese in 2016. While these rates aren’t more...
SF Chronicle: University of California researcher Rachel Morello-Frosch will begin taking blood and urine samples this week from 175 San Francisco, Santa Clara County and North Bay firefighters as part of a study into what types of toxic chemicals more...
Journal Sentinel: Best Babies Zone, a national initiative to reduce racial disparities in infant death rates, announced that it has added Milwaukee's Westlawn neighborhood to its list of communities that will receive its support.  While no funding more...
NY Times: In 2013, scientists discovered a new way to precisely edit genes — technology called Crispr that raised all sorts of enticing possibilities. Scientists wondered if it might be used to fix hereditary diseases, for example, or to develop new more...
Science News: Et tu, antibody? In humans, dengue can be more severe the second time around. Now, a study implicates an immune system treachery as the culprit. The study suggests that the amount of anti-dengue antibodies a person has matters. In a 12 more...

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