Commitment to Diversity

At the School of Public Health, we are proud to be part of the UC Berkeley campus community that is a national leader for equity and inclusion in higher education. Our diverse student body is our greatest asset. Our students’ ideas, agendas, passions, and commitments are making a positive difference in our diverse and global communities.

A campus committed to inclusiveness

UC Berkeley is committed to providing fair treatment, access, opportunity, and advancement for all — a commitment that lies at the heart of its mission as a public university. This commitment is also a continuation of UC Berkeley’s historical role in advancing principles and policies for a democratic society.

The campus is rightfully proud of the full spectrum of its diversity — encompassing differences in race, ethnicity, gender, age, and more. UC Berkeley’s Division of Equity and Inclusion provides leadership and accountability to resolve systemic inequities for all members of UC Berkeley through engaged research, teaching, and public service, and by expanding pathways for access and success, and promoting a healthy and engaging campus climate.

Health inequities and social determinants of health

Our emphasis on diversity, human rights, and social justice helps make UC Berkeley's School of Public Health one of the top 10 schools of public health in the country. Underserved communities continue to be disproportionately affected by illness and disability. Therefore, building health equity is a goal shared by many of our scholars. Every discipline within public health can make a significant difference in reducing health inequities.

The UC Berkeley School of Public Health is among the first schools of public health in the United States to emphasize the broad-based social and environmental determinants of health. It is widely recognized that the field of social epidemiology was pioneered at Berkeley under the leadership of Professor Leonard Syme.

Current Berkeley scholars are building on this legacy and producing the knowledge needed to reduce health inequalities that exist by race, ethnicity, and socio-economic status. They are also committed to moving their evidence-based public health research from publication to “public action” as quickly as possible.

Among the Berkeley faculty members leading research on multicultural issues in vulnerable populations are: Meredith Minkler, Amani Nuru-Jeter, Mahasin Mujahid, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Seth Holmes, Brenda Eskenazi, Sylvia Guendelman, Denise Herd, Darlene Francis, and Jennifer Ahern.

Academic excellence through diversity

The School’s D.R.E.A.M. Office (Diversity Respect Equity Action Multiculturalism Office) is dedicated to reaching out to underrepresented prospective students and those interested in working with vulnerable populations. Among other services, our team provides one-on-one advising, workshops, summer research opportunities, application assistance, and access to current UC Berkeley students through the Graduate Advising and Diversity Services (GRADS) program. We look forward to working with you as a student and as a future public health practitioner.

Student body snapshot 

At the UC Berkeley School of Public Health, we have a longstanding commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion as pathways to excellence at all levels of the School—via recruiting, mentoring, and inclusively engaging with diverse populations of students, faculty, staff, and community partners.

Here's our student body snapshot for 2014–2015:

Graduate Students

The information below is a snapshot of the UC Berkeley School of Public Health graduate student community for 2014-2015. Percentages are based on a total School enrollment of 570 graduate students. Please note: Numbers may not add up to 100 because of rounding.

STUDENTS OF COLOR

Asian Americans 24%
Latinos   9%
African Americans   6%
Native Americans   2%
TOTAL STUDENTS OF COLOR 41%

WHITE / CAUCASIAN

White/Caucasian  43%       

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

International Students  4%        

GENDER

Female  74%       
Male  26%

DECLINE TO STATE

Decline to State  13%        

 

Undergraduate Students

The information below is a snapshot of the UC Berkeley School of Public Health undergraduate student community for 2014–2015. Percentages are based on a total School enrollment of 435 undergraduate students. Please note: Numbers may not add up to 100 because of rounding.

STUDENTS OF COLOR

Asian Americans   58%
Latinos   13%
African Americans     5%
Native Americans   .23%
TOTAL STUDENTS OF COLOR   77%

WHITE / CAUCASIAN

White/Caucasian  20%       

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

International Students  3%        

DECLINE TO STATE

Decline to State  3%